Monthly Archive: September 2019

Essential Steps to Take Before Betting on Boxing

 Lots of people go to sports bars to enjoy the boxing match, soccer game, etc. They even place some bets on how the game is going to end. Yet, it’s not the best option if you wish to bet money on sports. It’s much more convenient, simple, and secure to bet online. There are a few things you need to learn beforehand but it’s worth your time.

Take into account these facts

In order to learn how to bet successfully, you need to have patience, attention to details, and a strategy. Start with a website. There are lots of options but the best one is likely to be the site devoted to boxing only. In this case, you are likely to have more events available since the big sites which accept bets on all kinds of sports mostly cover the main events only. Visit https://theboxingbet.com/ and find out if it works for you.

You should also set some limits. Define how much you are willing to lose and never place a stake higher than that sum of money. You’ll be grateful afterward, regardless of whether the bet was successful or not.

Keep the records of the boxing matches and your bets. Together, they’ll show you where your strategy needs improvement. It’s also essential to know what’s going on in the life of the boxers. At least the general information. Different events can greatly impact the outcome.

Another useful tip worth knowing

Unless you approach betting on sports seriously, you won’t start winning money. You need to learn how to keep your emotions away from the decision-making process and treat the case with full responsibility.

Boqueria Market

It was many centuries that shaped the market to what it is today. The abundance of relocations, renovations, and constant expansion transformed the collection of a few meat seller stalls into Europe’s greatest food market. Today it occupies 2,583 square meters and gives home to more than 270 stalls (273 at the moment to be precise).   The size and number of merchants is comparable only to the huge variety of the products the market offers. We can find poultry, game, meat, meat products , dry and fresh fruits and vegetables, seafood, olives, fresh and preserved fish here along deep-frozen meals, homemade pastry, sweets, and hand-crafted goods. Besides this, the market offers different programs, which are usually centered around food-cooking classes for adults and children, and wine tasting being the most common.   When entering the market, we see a huge mass of people running amongst the seemingly endless lines of stalls, merchants loudly offering their wares; and regardless of all the confusion, it somehow seems well organized. But with this size and the hundreds of thousands of people visiting the market, one might wonder, “Who is capable of keeping all this under control?”   The Stallholders Association encompasses all the sellers in the market and some of the florists and pet shops of La Rambla. They have an annual meeting where they decide about the main questions regarding the market, but the day-to-day issues are handled by the fifteen members of the board who are elected every four years. Besides this, they have all the staple staff of any professional organization: managers, secretaries, lawyers, IT department.   Even though the location of the entrance near the middle of La Rambla—one of the other famous tourist attractions of the city—makes it an obvious destination for all the visitors interested in the culinary pleasures, it is much more than a simple attraction for those who want to get familiar with the local tastes. It is a monument of the highly regarded Catalan cuisine where the local farmers and the chefs of the small bars represent the deep culinary traditions of the region. No wonder that besides tourists, it also draws in a large number of locals to do their groceries, and even famous chefs like Ferran Adria come here to get the best ingredients (and have a slice of pizza behind the fishmongers spot).   The market is open all days from 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. except Sunday, but if we want to avoid the crowd, we should get there before 2:00 p.m. since after this time, the market gets real busy. Visits on Saturdays also should be carefully considered. The sellers have their rest on the next day, so they will try to sell off all the products (especially the ones that stay fresh for a limited time such as fish), which might result in a lower price for good bargainers . On the other hand, the majority of the locals will do their groceries on this day, so one should expect huge traffic as well.   In any case, La Boqueria is a perfect place to feast your eyes on the wide range of delicacies, buy great wine, learn cooking, grab a glass of freshly squeezed juice (for only one euro), have a quick bite or a full meal at one of the legendary bars—such as Bar Pinotxo, which is easy to find at the entrance; just look for the big Pinocchio sitting on the top of the stall). It truly is a place where anyone who loves food can find what they are after

It was many centuries that shaped the market to what it is today. The abundance of relocations, renovations, and constant expansion transformed the collection of a few meat seller stalls into Europe’s greatest food market. Today it occupies 2,583 square meters and gives home to more than 270 stalls (273 at the moment to be precise).

The size and number of merchants is comparable only to the huge variety of the products the market offers. We can find poultry, game, meat, meat products , dry and fresh fruits and vegetables, seafood, olives, fresh and preserved fish here along deep-frozen meals, homemade pastry, sweets, and hand-crafted goods. Besides this, the market offers different programs, which are usually centered around food-cooking classes for adults and children, and wine tasting being the most common.

When entering the market, we see a huge mass of people running amongst the seemingly endless lines of stalls, merchants loudly offering their wares; and regardless of all the confusion, it somehow seems well organized. But with this size and the hundreds of thousands of people visiting the market, one might wonder, “Who is capable of keeping all this under control?”

The Stallholders Association encompasses all the sellers in the market and some of the florists and pet shops of La Rambla. They have an annual meeting where they decide about the main questions regarding the market, but the day-to-day issues are handled by the fifteen members of the board who are elected every four years. Besides this, they have all the staple staff of any professional organization: managers, secretaries, lawyers, IT department.

Even though the location of the entrance near the middle of La Rambla—one of the other famous tourist attractions of the city—makes it an obvious destination for all the visitors interested in the culinary pleasures, it is much more than a simple attraction for those who want to get familiar with the local tastes. It is a monument of the highly regarded Catalan cuisine where the local farmers and the chefs of the small bars represent the deep culinary traditions of the region. No wonder that besides tourists, it also draws in a large number of locals to do their groceries, and even famous chefs like Ferran Adria come here to get the best ingredients (and have a slice of pizza behind the fishmongers spot).

The market is open all days from 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. except Sunday, but if we want to avoid the crowd, we should get there before 2:00 p.m. since after this time, the market gets real busy. Visits on Saturdays also should be carefully considered. The sellers have their rest on the next day, so they will try to sell off all the products (especially the ones that stay fresh for a limited time such as fish), which might result in a lower price for good bargainers . On the other hand, the majority of the locals will do their groceries on this day, so one should expect huge traffic as well.

In any case, La Boqueria is a perfect place to feast your eyes on the wide range of delicacies, buy great wine, learn cooking, grab a glass of freshly squeezed juice (for only one euro), have a quick bite or a full meal at one of the legendary bars—such as Bar Pinotxo, which is easy to find at the entrance; just look for the big Pinocchio sitting on the top of the stall). It truly is a place where anyone who loves food can find what they are after

The History of La Boqueria

The first mention of La Boqueria dates back to 1217. Tables installed near the old city gate were mostly selling meat. According to some sources, the name La Boqueria came from the word boc, which means goat, the most popular meat sold here at the time. The market was set up unofficially by the merchants who tried to sell some of their products before entering the city so that they can save on the taxes.

From December of 1470, a pig market was held here, and the place became known as Mercat Bornet. After this, it became Mercat de la Palla and still failed to gain official status—most people considered it to be a part of the nearby Placa Nova market.

The real breakthrough in the market’s “life” came around the eighteenth century when La Rambla started to gain popularity. So did the market, and vendors from nearby towns started to come to try selling their goods as well. This didn’t please the old merchants much, which led to fierce argument. The city leaders decided that when entering through the gates, the butchers offering their products and shouting at each other shouldn’t be the entertainment for those taking a stroll on the city’s most prominent walking street, so they relocated the market. The new place was near to the orchards of the covenant of St. Joseph—still close to La Rambla, but not directly on the street itself.

In 1835, during huge demonstrations all over Spain, people burned down the neighboring St. James covenant amongst many others. A square surrounded by arcades was built on its place (the biggest one in Barcelona), and the authorities decided to move the market here temporarily. This partly failed—the temporary part, that is, since this became the final home of Mercat de Sant Josep de la Boqueria.

At this point, the market was still on the open air, but the works on a roof began in 1840 on St. Joseph’s Day. Even though the market gained its official status the same year, the roof wasn’t finished until 1853. They also divided it into different sectors based on the products of the merchants, which were limited to meat and flowers by this time, but soon after, birds were added.

During the past 150 years of its official existence, the market went through a few more changes. In 1861, the fruit and vegetable sellers made their way into the building. After an expansion in 1869, the great change in the market’s existence came due to the introduction of gas lighting on Christmas of 1871. The fishmongers got their own section in 1911, and the metal roof that is still an attraction and, in a way, the symbol of the market was constructed in 1914.

The metal roof was the landmark of the modernization of the market. Not only the sanitation improved gradually after this, but the overall appearance of the market as well. Soon it started its march, becoming the celebrated tourist attraction it is today.

The sellers offering their products there today are mostly fourth-generation La Boqueria merchants representing both the long traditions of the market and the new ideas that keep it exciting and dynamically evolving. At present, there is barely any food in Spain that cannot be found here; and besides the wide range of food products, it also offers artisan handicrafts and farmer’s shops.

Even though we can see that the market came a long way from a tax-saving trick by the merchants, it is safe to say that today, it took its righteous place as the king of European—if not the whole world’s—food markets.

Barcelona Markets

When we talk about Barcelona food markets, La Boqueria is definitely the first and most important to mention. However, besides the largest market, there are almost forty other smaller local markets that one can visit—some of these are more specialized like the Fira Artesana, famous for its organic Catalonian products.

Much like La Boqueria, Fira Artesana is also close to La Rambla, barely one hundred meters from the Liceu subway station. However, the market is only held on every first Friday of each month. The stalls are open from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and then again after siesta from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. At this time, we should be prepared for special honeys and everything good one can do with this golden sweet product—cheeses infused with honey, sweets, nuts preserved in honey, and other goods that make Fira Artesana live up to its nickname, the Honey Market.

Close to the Sant Antoni subway station, Mercat de Sant Antoni awaits those who want a more general experience. The monumental steel construct that gives home to it is just closing to the end of its renovation. It invites us every day except Friday to take a look at its wares. Being a flea market, it offers clothing items, coins, and books (besides food). From Monday to Friday, it holds siesta from 2:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. But besides this, it is open from 7:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. On weekends and vigil days, the market skips the siesta to offer its goods for a straight thirteen hours (and a half).

There are a number of other markets that can take pride in being more than a century old. El Clot (at the Clot subway station), Mercat de Poblenou (near two-minute walk from Poblenou subway station), and Abaceria Central Market (about four hundred meters from Gracia subway station) have a lot in common besides their age. All of them are built to supply a smaller region with all the fresh fish, poultry, meat, fruits, vegetables, and all the food one might need.

Due to the dynamic expansion of the heart of Catalonia, modern markets started to pop up since the mid-sixties as well to meet the needs of the growing population. It is safe to say that today, every region of the city has a local market close to it. The Ciutat Meridiana Market, Canyeles Market, and Carmel Market (all close to the subway station of the same name) are representatives of these new local gems. On one occasion, in the case of Les Tres Torres, they even reconstructed a film studio into a market.

As we can see, we do not need to travel great distances to get to a market. While it is definitely worth the time to visit La Boqueria at least once when we visit the city, it is not an issue to find a market at a convenient distance from any location of Barcelona for those who love to browse and taste the local products